Co-electrospraying of tumour cell mimicking hollow polymeric microspheres for diffusion magnetic resonance imagingCitation formats

  • External authors:
  • Hui Hui Wu
  • Damien J. McHugh
  • Ian Wimpenny
  • Xun Zhang

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Co-electrospraying of tumour cell mimicking hollow polymeric microspheres for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. / Zhou, Feng Lei; Wu, Hui Hui; McHugh, Damien J.; Wimpenny, Ian; Zhang, Xun; Gough, Julie E.; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; Parker, Geoff J.M.

In: Materials Science and Engineering C, Vol. 101, 01.08.2019, p. 217-227.

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Zhou, Feng Lei ; Wu, Hui Hui ; McHugh, Damien J. ; Wimpenny, Ian ; Zhang, Xun ; Gough, Julie E. ; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L. ; Parker, Geoff J.M. / Co-electrospraying of tumour cell mimicking hollow polymeric microspheres for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. In: Materials Science and Engineering C. 2019 ; Vol. 101. pp. 217-227.

Bibtex

@article{c8718107d608437fb37beb0bd4acc335,
title = "Co-electrospraying of tumour cell mimicking hollow polymeric microspheres for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging",
abstract = "Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is considered as a useful tool to study solid tumours. However, the interpretation of dMRI signal and validation of quantitative measurements of is challenging. One way to address these challenges is by using a standard reference material that can mimic tumour cell microstructure. There is a growing interest in using hollow polymeric microspheres, mainly prepared by multiple steps, as mimics of cells in healthy and diseased tissue. The present work reports on tumour cell-mimicking materials composed of hollow microspheres for application as a standard material in dMRI. These microspheres were prepared via one-step co-electrospraying process. The shell material was poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymers with different molecule weights and/or ratios of glycolic acid-to-lactic, while the core was polyethylene glycol (PEG) or ethylene glycol. The resultant co-electrosprayed products were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and synchrotron X-ray micro-CT. These products were found to have variable structures and morphologies, e.g. from spherical particles with/without surface hole, through beaded fibres to smooth fibres, which mainly depend on PLGA composition and core materials. Only the shell material of PLGA polymer with ester terminated, Mw 50,000–75,000 g mol −1 , and lactide:glycolide 85:15 formed hollow microspheres via the co-electrospraying process using the core material of 8 wt{\%} PEG/chloroform as the core. A water-filled test object (or phantom) was designed and constructed from samples of the material generated from co-electrosprayed PLGA microspheres and tested on a 7 T MRI scanner. The preliminary MRI results provide evidence that hollow PLGA microspheres can restrict/hinder water diffusion as cells do in tumour tissue, implying that the phantom may be suitable for use as a quantitative validation and calibration tool for dMRI.",
keywords = "Co-electrospraying, Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, Hollow microspheres, Phantom, Tumour cells",
author = "Zhou, {Feng Lei} and Wu, {Hui Hui} and McHugh, {Damien J.} and Ian Wimpenny and Xun Zhang and Gough, {Julie E.} and {Hubbard Cristinacce}, {Penny L.} and Parker, {Geoff J.M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.msec.2019.03.062",
language = "English",
volume = "101",
pages = "217--227",
journal = "Materials Science and Engineering C: Materials for Biological Applications",
issn = "0928-4931",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Co-electrospraying of tumour cell mimicking hollow polymeric microspheres for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

AU - Zhou, Feng Lei

AU - Wu, Hui Hui

AU - McHugh, Damien J.

AU - Wimpenny, Ian

AU - Zhang, Xun

AU - Gough, Julie E.

AU - Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.

AU - Parker, Geoff J.M.

PY - 2019/8/1

Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is considered as a useful tool to study solid tumours. However, the interpretation of dMRI signal and validation of quantitative measurements of is challenging. One way to address these challenges is by using a standard reference material that can mimic tumour cell microstructure. There is a growing interest in using hollow polymeric microspheres, mainly prepared by multiple steps, as mimics of cells in healthy and diseased tissue. The present work reports on tumour cell-mimicking materials composed of hollow microspheres for application as a standard material in dMRI. These microspheres were prepared via one-step co-electrospraying process. The shell material was poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymers with different molecule weights and/or ratios of glycolic acid-to-lactic, while the core was polyethylene glycol (PEG) or ethylene glycol. The resultant co-electrosprayed products were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and synchrotron X-ray micro-CT. These products were found to have variable structures and morphologies, e.g. from spherical particles with/without surface hole, through beaded fibres to smooth fibres, which mainly depend on PLGA composition and core materials. Only the shell material of PLGA polymer with ester terminated, Mw 50,000–75,000 g mol −1 , and lactide:glycolide 85:15 formed hollow microspheres via the co-electrospraying process using the core material of 8 wt% PEG/chloroform as the core. A water-filled test object (or phantom) was designed and constructed from samples of the material generated from co-electrosprayed PLGA microspheres and tested on a 7 T MRI scanner. The preliminary MRI results provide evidence that hollow PLGA microspheres can restrict/hinder water diffusion as cells do in tumour tissue, implying that the phantom may be suitable for use as a quantitative validation and calibration tool for dMRI.

AB - Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is considered as a useful tool to study solid tumours. However, the interpretation of dMRI signal and validation of quantitative measurements of is challenging. One way to address these challenges is by using a standard reference material that can mimic tumour cell microstructure. There is a growing interest in using hollow polymeric microspheres, mainly prepared by multiple steps, as mimics of cells in healthy and diseased tissue. The present work reports on tumour cell-mimicking materials composed of hollow microspheres for application as a standard material in dMRI. These microspheres were prepared via one-step co-electrospraying process. The shell material was poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymers with different molecule weights and/or ratios of glycolic acid-to-lactic, while the core was polyethylene glycol (PEG) or ethylene glycol. The resultant co-electrosprayed products were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and synchrotron X-ray micro-CT. These products were found to have variable structures and morphologies, e.g. from spherical particles with/without surface hole, through beaded fibres to smooth fibres, which mainly depend on PLGA composition and core materials. Only the shell material of PLGA polymer with ester terminated, Mw 50,000–75,000 g mol −1 , and lactide:glycolide 85:15 formed hollow microspheres via the co-electrospraying process using the core material of 8 wt% PEG/chloroform as the core. A water-filled test object (or phantom) was designed and constructed from samples of the material generated from co-electrosprayed PLGA microspheres and tested on a 7 T MRI scanner. The preliminary MRI results provide evidence that hollow PLGA microspheres can restrict/hinder water diffusion as cells do in tumour tissue, implying that the phantom may be suitable for use as a quantitative validation and calibration tool for dMRI.

KW - Co-electrospraying

KW - Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Hollow microspheres

KW - Phantom

KW - Tumour cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063604672&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.msec.2019.03.062

DO - 10.1016/j.msec.2019.03.062

M3 - Article

VL - 101

SP - 217

EP - 227

JO - Materials Science and Engineering C: Materials for Biological Applications

JF - Materials Science and Engineering C: Materials for Biological Applications

SN - 0928-4931

ER -