Britain after Brexit: a nation dividedCitation formats

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Britain after Brexit: a nation divided. / Ford, Robert.

In: Journal of Democracy, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.2018, p. 17-30.

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Ford R. Britain after Brexit: a nation divided. Journal of Democracy. 2018 Jan;28(1):17-30.

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Ford, Robert. / Britain after Brexit: a nation divided. In: Journal of Democracy. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 17-30.

Bibtex

@article{ba52582f30b9420880c7a7432e09a742,
title = "Britain after Brexit: a nation divided",
abstract = "On 23 June 2016, the United Kingdom voted by a 52 to 48 margin to leave the European Union. The result of the EU referendum was the latest and most dramatic expression of long-term social changes that have been silently reshaping public opinion, political behavior, and party competition in Britain and Western democracies. In this essay, we consider the underlying social and attitudinal shifts that made “Brexit” and the rise to prominence of the populist, right-wing U.K. Independence Party (UKIP) possible. Finally, we consider what these momentous developments reveal about the state of British politics and society.",
author = "Robert Ford",
year = "2018",
month = jan,
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "17--30",
journal = "Journal of Democracy",
issn = "1045-5736",
publisher = "Johns Hopkins University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Britain after Brexit: a nation divided

AU - Ford, Robert

PY - 2018/1

Y1 - 2018/1

N2 - On 23 June 2016, the United Kingdom voted by a 52 to 48 margin to leave the European Union. The result of the EU referendum was the latest and most dramatic expression of long-term social changes that have been silently reshaping public opinion, political behavior, and party competition in Britain and Western democracies. In this essay, we consider the underlying social and attitudinal shifts that made “Brexit” and the rise to prominence of the populist, right-wing U.K. Independence Party (UKIP) possible. Finally, we consider what these momentous developments reveal about the state of British politics and society.

AB - On 23 June 2016, the United Kingdom voted by a 52 to 48 margin to leave the European Union. The result of the EU referendum was the latest and most dramatic expression of long-term social changes that have been silently reshaping public opinion, political behavior, and party competition in Britain and Western democracies. In this essay, we consider the underlying social and attitudinal shifts that made “Brexit” and the rise to prominence of the populist, right-wing U.K. Independence Party (UKIP) possible. Finally, we consider what these momentous developments reveal about the state of British politics and society.

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 17

EP - 30

JO - Journal of Democracy

JF - Journal of Democracy

SN - 1045-5736

IS - 1

ER -