Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbonCitation formats

  • External authors:
  • James Heath
  • Edward Ayres
  • Malcolm Possell
  • Helaina I J Black
  • Helen Grant
  • Phil Ineson
  • Gerhard Kerstiens

Standard

Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon. / Heath, James; Ayres, Edward; Possell, Malcolm; Bardgett, Richard D.; Black, Helaina I J; Grant, Helen; Ineson, Phil; Kerstiens, Gerhard.

In: Science, Vol. 309, No. 5741, 09.09.2005, p. 1711-1713.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Heath, J, Ayres, E, Possell, M, Bardgett, RD, Black, HIJ, Grant, H, Ineson, P & Kerstiens, G 2005, 'Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon', Science, vol. 309, no. 5741, pp. 1711-1713. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1110700

APA

Heath, J., Ayres, E., Possell, M., Bardgett, R. D., Black, H. I. J., Grant, H., ... Kerstiens, G. (2005). Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon. Science, 309(5741), 1711-1713. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1110700

Vancouver

Heath J, Ayres E, Possell M, Bardgett RD, Black HIJ, Grant H et al. Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon. Science. 2005 Sep 9;309(5741):1711-1713. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1110700

Author

Heath, James ; Ayres, Edward ; Possell, Malcolm ; Bardgett, Richard D. ; Black, Helaina I J ; Grant, Helen ; Ineson, Phil ; Kerstiens, Gerhard. / Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon. In: Science. 2005 ; Vol. 309, No. 5741. pp. 1711-1713.

Bibtex

@article{eb03582d55264abe82be87890fabfd51,
title = "Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon",
abstract = "Forests have a key role as carbon sinks, which could potentially mitigate the continuing increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and associated climate change. We show that carbon dioxide enrichment, although causing short-term growth stimulation in a range of European tree species, also leads to an increase in soil microbial respiration and a marked decline in sequestration of root-derived carbon in the soil. These findings indicate that, should similar processes operate in forest ecosystems, the size of the annual terrestrial carbon sink may be substantially reduced, resulting in a positive feedback on the rate of increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration.",
author = "James Heath and Edward Ayres and Malcolm Possell and Bardgett, {Richard D.} and Black, {Helaina I J} and Helen Grant and Phil Ineson and Gerhard Kerstiens",
note = "Heath, J Ayres, E Possell, M Bardgett, RD Black, HIJ Grant, H Ineson, P Kerstiens, G",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1126/science.1110700",
language = "English",
volume = "309",
pages = "1711--1713",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science (A A A S)",
number = "5741",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Atmospheric science: Rising atmospheric CO2 reduces sequestration of root-derived soil carbon

AU - Heath, James

AU - Ayres, Edward

AU - Possell, Malcolm

AU - Bardgett, Richard D.

AU - Black, Helaina I J

AU - Grant, Helen

AU - Ineson, Phil

AU - Kerstiens, Gerhard

N1 - Heath, J Ayres, E Possell, M Bardgett, RD Black, HIJ Grant, H Ineson, P Kerstiens, G

PY - 2005/9/9

Y1 - 2005/9/9

N2 - Forests have a key role as carbon sinks, which could potentially mitigate the continuing increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and associated climate change. We show that carbon dioxide enrichment, although causing short-term growth stimulation in a range of European tree species, also leads to an increase in soil microbial respiration and a marked decline in sequestration of root-derived carbon in the soil. These findings indicate that, should similar processes operate in forest ecosystems, the size of the annual terrestrial carbon sink may be substantially reduced, resulting in a positive feedback on the rate of increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration.

AB - Forests have a key role as carbon sinks, which could potentially mitigate the continuing increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and associated climate change. We show that carbon dioxide enrichment, although causing short-term growth stimulation in a range of European tree species, also leads to an increase in soil microbial respiration and a marked decline in sequestration of root-derived carbon in the soil. These findings indicate that, should similar processes operate in forest ecosystems, the size of the annual terrestrial carbon sink may be substantially reduced, resulting in a positive feedback on the rate of increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration.

U2 - 10.1126/science.1110700

DO - 10.1126/science.1110700

M3 - Article

VL - 309

SP - 1711

EP - 1713

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 5741

ER -