Associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the Glasgow conurbation, UK.Citation formats

  • Authors:
  • I J Beverland
  • M Carder
  • G R Cohen
  • M R Heal
  • R M Agius

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Associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the Glasgow conurbation, UK. / Beverland, I J; Carder, M; Cohen, G R; Heal, M R; Agius, R M.

In: Environment International, Vol. 50, 01.12.2012, p. 1-6.

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Beverland, I J ; Carder, M ; Cohen, G R ; Heal, M R ; Agius, R M. / Associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the Glasgow conurbation, UK. In: Environment International. 2012 ; Vol. 50. pp. 1-6.

Bibtex

@article{f43dd353a94746a7bdcf89c4eb3417ec,
title = "Associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the Glasgow conurbation, UK.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To examine associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the population of Glasgow and the adjacent towns of Renfrew and Paisley over a 25-year period at different time lags (0-30 days). METHODS: Generalised linear (Poisson) models were used to investigate the relationship between lagged black smoke concentrations and daily mortality, with allowance for confounding by cold temperature, between 1974 and 1998. RESULTS: When a range of lag periods were investigated significant associations were noted between temperature-adjusted black smoke exposure and all-cause mortality at lag periods of 13-18 and 19-24 days, and respiratory mortality at lag periods of 1-6, 7-12, and 13-18 days. Significant associations between cardiovascular mortality and temperature-adjusted black smoke were not observed. After adjusting for the effects of temperature a 10 μgm(-3) increase in black smoke concentration on a given day was associated with a 0.9{\%} [95{\%} Confidence Interval (CI): 0.3-1.5{\%}] increase in all cause mortality and a 3.1{\%} [95{\%} CI: 1.4-4.9{\%}] increase in respiratory mortality over the ensuing 30-day period. In contrast for a 10 μgm(-3) increase in black smoke concentration over 0-3 day lag period, the temperature adjusted exposure mortality associations were substantially lower (0.2{\%} [95{\%} CI: -0.0-0.4{\%}] and 0.3{\%} [95{\%} CI: -0.2-0.8{\%}] increases for all-cause and respiratory mortality respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study has provided evidence of association between black smoke exposure and mortality at longer lag periods than have been investigated in the majority of time series analyses.",
keywords = "Black, Lag, Mortality, Series, Smoke, Time",
author = "Beverland, {I J} and M Carder and Cohen, {G R} and Heal, {M R} and Agius, {R M}",
note = "G9900747, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.envint.2012.08.012",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "Environment International",
issn = "0160-4120",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the Glasgow conurbation, UK.

AU - Beverland, I J

AU - Carder, M

AU - Cohen, G R

AU - Heal, M R

AU - Agius, R M

N1 - G9900747, Medical Research Council, United Kingdom

PY - 2012/12/1

Y1 - 2012/12/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the population of Glasgow and the adjacent towns of Renfrew and Paisley over a 25-year period at different time lags (0-30 days). METHODS: Generalised linear (Poisson) models were used to investigate the relationship between lagged black smoke concentrations and daily mortality, with allowance for confounding by cold temperature, between 1974 and 1998. RESULTS: When a range of lag periods were investigated significant associations were noted between temperature-adjusted black smoke exposure and all-cause mortality at lag periods of 13-18 and 19-24 days, and respiratory mortality at lag periods of 1-6, 7-12, and 13-18 days. Significant associations between cardiovascular mortality and temperature-adjusted black smoke were not observed. After adjusting for the effects of temperature a 10 μgm(-3) increase in black smoke concentration on a given day was associated with a 0.9% [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.3-1.5%] increase in all cause mortality and a 3.1% [95% CI: 1.4-4.9%] increase in respiratory mortality over the ensuing 30-day period. In contrast for a 10 μgm(-3) increase in black smoke concentration over 0-3 day lag period, the temperature adjusted exposure mortality associations were substantially lower (0.2% [95% CI: -0.0-0.4%] and 0.3% [95% CI: -0.2-0.8%] increases for all-cause and respiratory mortality respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study has provided evidence of association between black smoke exposure and mortality at longer lag periods than have been investigated in the majority of time series analyses.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To examine associations between short/medium-term variations in black smoke air pollution and mortality in the population of Glasgow and the adjacent towns of Renfrew and Paisley over a 25-year period at different time lags (0-30 days). METHODS: Generalised linear (Poisson) models were used to investigate the relationship between lagged black smoke concentrations and daily mortality, with allowance for confounding by cold temperature, between 1974 and 1998. RESULTS: When a range of lag periods were investigated significant associations were noted between temperature-adjusted black smoke exposure and all-cause mortality at lag periods of 13-18 and 19-24 days, and respiratory mortality at lag periods of 1-6, 7-12, and 13-18 days. Significant associations between cardiovascular mortality and temperature-adjusted black smoke were not observed. After adjusting for the effects of temperature a 10 μgm(-3) increase in black smoke concentration on a given day was associated with a 0.9% [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.3-1.5%] increase in all cause mortality and a 3.1% [95% CI: 1.4-4.9%] increase in respiratory mortality over the ensuing 30-day period. In contrast for a 10 μgm(-3) increase in black smoke concentration over 0-3 day lag period, the temperature adjusted exposure mortality associations were substantially lower (0.2% [95% CI: -0.0-0.4%] and 0.3% [95% CI: -0.2-0.8%] increases for all-cause and respiratory mortality respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study has provided evidence of association between black smoke exposure and mortality at longer lag periods than have been investigated in the majority of time series analyses.

KW - Black

KW - Lag

KW - Mortality

KW - Series

KW - Smoke

KW - Time

U2 - 10.1016/j.envint.2012.08.012

DO - 10.1016/j.envint.2012.08.012

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 1

EP - 6

JO - Environment International

T2 - Environment International

JF - Environment International

SN - 0160-4120

ER -