Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public artsCitation formats

  • Authors:
  • Stuart Cameron
  • Jon Coaffee

Standard

Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public arts. / Cameron, Stuart; Coaffee, Jon.

In: European Journal of Housing Policy, Vol. 5, No. 1, 04.2005, p. 39-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Cameron, S & Coaffee, J 2005, 'Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public arts', European Journal of Housing Policy, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 39-58. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616710500055687

APA

Cameron, S., & Coaffee, J. (2005). Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public arts. European Journal of Housing Policy, 5(1), 39-58. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616710500055687

Vancouver

Cameron S, Coaffee J. Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public arts. European Journal of Housing Policy. 2005 Apr;5(1):39-58. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616710500055687

Author

Cameron, Stuart ; Coaffee, Jon. / Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public arts. In: European Journal of Housing Policy. 2005 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 39-58.

Bibtex

@article{5469288599934596af0c19ab6cebf8e3,
title = "Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public arts",
abstract = "The role of art and the artist has played apart in both of the main long-established theories of gentrification, looking respectively at 'culture' and 'capital' as key drivers. Cultural analyses of gentrification have identified the individual artist as an important agent in the initiation of gentrification processes in old working-class neighbourhoods. Alternative theorizations have recognized a second stage where capital follows the artist into gentrified localities, commodifying its cultural assets and displacing original artists/ gentrifiers. The paper will argue that more recently a third key model of gentrification can be recognized where the main driver of gentrification is 'public policy' which seeks to use 'positive' gentrification as an engine of urban renaissance. This involves the use of public art and cultural facilities as a promoter of regeneration and associated gentrification. This will be examined in relation to the art s-led regeneration strategy adopted in Gateshead in north-east England and critique whether the linking of art, regeneration and gentrification as public policy can be extended beyond the usual 'Docklands'-style localities of urban renaissance. In particular, it will consider whether this might play a role in the transformation of unpopular and stigmatized urban neighbourhoods and the renewal of urban housing markets. {\circledC} 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.",
keywords = "Arts policy, Regeneration, United Kingdom",
author = "Stuart Cameron and Jon Coaffee",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1080/14616710500055687",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "39--58",
journal = "European Journal of Housing Policy",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Art, gentrification and regeneraton - From artist as pioneer to public arts

AU - Cameron, Stuart

AU - Coaffee, Jon

PY - 2005/4

Y1 - 2005/4

N2 - The role of art and the artist has played apart in both of the main long-established theories of gentrification, looking respectively at 'culture' and 'capital' as key drivers. Cultural analyses of gentrification have identified the individual artist as an important agent in the initiation of gentrification processes in old working-class neighbourhoods. Alternative theorizations have recognized a second stage where capital follows the artist into gentrified localities, commodifying its cultural assets and displacing original artists/ gentrifiers. The paper will argue that more recently a third key model of gentrification can be recognized where the main driver of gentrification is 'public policy' which seeks to use 'positive' gentrification as an engine of urban renaissance. This involves the use of public art and cultural facilities as a promoter of regeneration and associated gentrification. This will be examined in relation to the art s-led regeneration strategy adopted in Gateshead in north-east England and critique whether the linking of art, regeneration and gentrification as public policy can be extended beyond the usual 'Docklands'-style localities of urban renaissance. In particular, it will consider whether this might play a role in the transformation of unpopular and stigmatized urban neighbourhoods and the renewal of urban housing markets. © 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.

AB - The role of art and the artist has played apart in both of the main long-established theories of gentrification, looking respectively at 'culture' and 'capital' as key drivers. Cultural analyses of gentrification have identified the individual artist as an important agent in the initiation of gentrification processes in old working-class neighbourhoods. Alternative theorizations have recognized a second stage where capital follows the artist into gentrified localities, commodifying its cultural assets and displacing original artists/ gentrifiers. The paper will argue that more recently a third key model of gentrification can be recognized where the main driver of gentrification is 'public policy' which seeks to use 'positive' gentrification as an engine of urban renaissance. This involves the use of public art and cultural facilities as a promoter of regeneration and associated gentrification. This will be examined in relation to the art s-led regeneration strategy adopted in Gateshead in north-east England and critique whether the linking of art, regeneration and gentrification as public policy can be extended beyond the usual 'Docklands'-style localities of urban renaissance. In particular, it will consider whether this might play a role in the transformation of unpopular and stigmatized urban neighbourhoods and the renewal of urban housing markets. © 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.

KW - Arts policy

KW - Regeneration

KW - United Kingdom

U2 - 10.1080/14616710500055687

DO - 10.1080/14616710500055687

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 39

EP - 58

JO - European Journal of Housing Policy

JF - European Journal of Housing Policy

IS - 1

ER -