VARIOUS NATIONAL MEDIA: Working mothers up to 40% more stressed, study finds

Press/Media: Research

Release date: 27/1/2019

Description

Biomarkers for chronic stress are 40% higher in women bringing up two children while working full-time, new research has found.

Working from home and flexitime have no effect on their level of chronic stress – only putting in fewer hours at work helps, says an article in the journal Sociology.

Professor Tarani Chandola of The University of Manchester, and Dr Cara Booker, Professor Meena Kumari and Professor Michaela Benzeval of the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex analysed data on 6,025 participants in Understanding Society’s UK Household Longitudinal Survey, which collects information on working life and readings of measures of stress response, including hormones levels and blood pressure.

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/working-mothers-up-to-40-more-stressed/

COVERED IN THE OBSERVER AND INDEPENDENT

Media coverage

TitleTHE INDEPENDENT: Full-time working mothers are 40% more stressed, study finds
Media name/outletThe Independent
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date27/01/19
DescriptionMothers who have two children and a full-time job have significantly elevated stress levels, new research has discovered.

A team of researchers from the University of Manchester and the University of Essex analysed data from more than 6,000 individuals collated by The UK Household Longitudinal Study.
URLhttps://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/working-mother-stress-work-full-time-job-pressure-children-family-study-a8749191.html
PersonsTarani Chandola

Media contributions

TitleTHE OBSERVER: Working mothers ‘up to 40% more stressed’
Media name/outletThe Observer
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date27/01/19
DescriptionThey may have had more than a sneaking suspicion that it was the case, but now working mothers have the data to back it up: they are indeed more stressed than other people – 18% more, in fact.

And that figure rises to 40% for those with two children, according to a major study that analysed 11 key indicators of chronic stress levels.

Professor Tarani Chandola, of Manchester University, and Dr Cara Booker, Professor Meena Kumari and Professor Michaela Benzeval, of the Institute for Social and Economic Research at Essex University, examined biological data taken by nurses from 6,025 participants in the UK Household Longitudinal Survey, the largest survey of its kind in the world.
URLhttps://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/jan/27/working-mothers-more-stressed-health
PersonsTarani Chandola