VARIOUS MEDIA: Researchers discover when it’s good to get the blues

Press/Media: Research

Release date: 16/12/2019

Description

Contrary to common belief, blue light may not be as disruptive to our sleep patterns as originally thought - according to University of Manchester scientists.

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/researchers-discover-when-its-good-to-get-the-blues/

#Also covered in the Times#

Media coverage

TitleAll that stuff about ‘blue light’ and sleep may not be accurate, study claims
Media name/outletMetro
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date19/12/19
DescriptionEveryone’s heard the warnings about how blue light from a phone or a tablet is detrimental to our sleep.

As such, phones now come with ‘night modes’ that filter out the blue light and replace it with warmer, softer hues. The idea being that we can all continue to scroll and browse without disrupting our circadian rhythms.

But as ever with science, it’s not that straightforward.
URLhttps://metro.co.uk/2019/12/19/all-that-stuff-about-blue-light-and-sleep-may-not-be-accurate-study-claims-11928074/
PersonsTimothy Brown
TitleiPhone's Night Shift mode might be hurting instead of helping you, study suggests
Media name/outletMashable
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited States
Date18/12/19
DescriptionIn Jan. 2016, Apple introduced a new iOS option called Night Shift. It reduces the blue light emitted by your phone/tablet's display, which should, ideally, reduce the strain on your eyes while you're using the device late at night. And basically every Android phone maker soon followed suit with a similar feature.

But a new study by researchers from the University of Manchester (via The Guardian) suggests that features like Night Shift might be doing more harm than good.
URLhttps://mashable.com/article/night-shift-no-good-study/?europe=true
PersonsTimothy Brown
Title Apple's Night Shift Mode on iPhone may be hurting your eyes, claims study
Media name/outletBusiness Standard
Media typeWeb
CountryIndia
Date18/12/19
DescriptionNight Shift Mode on the Apple iPhone is designed to help ease your eyes while using the device in low light conditions. However, a new study has claimed that it may be doing more harm than good.
URLhttps://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ani/apple-s-night-shift-mode-on-iphone-may-be-hurting-your-eyes-claims-study-119121801535_1.html
PersonsTimothy Brown
TitleNot such a bright idea: why your phone’s ‘night mode’ may be keeping you awake
Media name/outletThe Guardian
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date17/12/19
Description‘Night mode” is one of those features you may be aware of only because your phone keeps telling you about it. At some point while you are lying in bed at night sending texts, your screen may politely suggest you activate a function that shifts the colours of your screen from the colder to the warmer end of the spectrum. It is supposed to help you sleep better.
URLhttps://www.theguardian.com/technology/shortcuts/2019/dec/17/not-such-a-bright-idea-why-your-phones-night-mode-may-be-keeping-you-awake
PersonsTimothy Brown
TitleWhat's the best colour lighting for sleep?
Media name/outletBBC News Online
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date17/12/19
DescriptionThe idea artificial light from screens is keeping people awake at night is flawed, say scientists who have been studying the best type of lighting to nod off to.

According to the researchers, from Manchester University, this blue light from devices is not the main problem.
URLhttps://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-50807011
PersonsTimothy Brown
TitleBlue light from phones and TVs may not be as disruptive to your sleep as originally thought 'and night modes could actually confuse the brain'
Media name/outletMail Online
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date16/12/19
DescriptionLooking at blue light from phones, laptops and TVs at night may not be as bad for your sleep as originally feared, scientists claim.

A study on mice found dim blue lights actually had less of an effect on the animals' body clock than equally bright yellow lights.

This flies in the face of research suggesting warmer tones, like those used in 'night modes', are less likely to keep people up at night.

Instead, such software which changes screen colours of electronic gadgets as the evening sets in could confuse the brain and affect our sleep.
URLhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-7797401/Blue-light-not-disruptive-sleep-originally-thought.html
PersonsTimothy Brown