VARIOUS INTERNATIONAL MEDIA: Whales and dolphins have rich ‘human-like’ cultures and societies

Press / Media: Research

Release date: 16/10/2017

Description

Whales and dolphins (Cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects – much like human societies.

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/whales-and-dolphins-have-rich-human-like-cultures-and-societies/

Media coverage

TitleWhale and dolphin societies are like those of humans, scientists report
Media name / outletThe Age
Media typeWeb
CountryAustralia
Date19/10/17
DescriptionWhales and dolphins live in complex "societies" that mimic those of human populations, scientists say.

In the first study of its kind, researchers gathered information about brain size and social behaviour from 90 species of dolphins, whales and porpoises.
URLwww.theage.com.au/environment/whale-watch/whale-and-dolphin-societies-are-like-those-of-humans-scientists-report-20171017-gz2ztr.html
PersonsSusanne Shultz
TitleMuch ado about the brain
Media name / outletThe Hindu
Media typeWeb
CountryIndia
Date17/10/17
DescriptionAn implicit assumption is that only human beings have a special organ called a ‘complex brain’. Ergo, man rules. Unfortunately inconvenient truths have needled this hypothesis: chimpanzees that counted, ants that made empires, parrots that constructed meaningful sentences, and elephants that demonstrated empathy. One school of animal behaviourists says it is important to study animal behaviour to pry out those elusive attributes that made us special. The other camp has decided that just like science proved the earth to be an an ordinary rock going around the sun, people’s brains too aren’t special.
URLwww.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/much-ado-about-the-brain/article19872424.ece
PersonsSusanne Shultz
TitleWhales and dolphins lead 'human-like lives' thanks to big brains, says study
Media name / outletThe Guardian
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date16/10/17
DescriptionLife is not so different beneath the ocean waves. Bottlenose dolphins use simple tools, orcas call each other by name, and sperm whales talk in local dialects. Many cetaceans live in tight-knit groups and spend a good deal of time at play.
URLhttps://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/16/whales-and-dolphins-human-like-societies-thanks-to-their-big-brains
PersonsSusanne Shultz
TitleThe most social dolphins and whales have larger, more complex brains
Media name / outletNBC
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited States
Date16/10/17
DescriptionDolphins and whales speak in accents. They have “hit” songs. They have names for each other and they might gossip.
URLhttps://www.today.com/health/whales-dolphins-have-big-brains-study-tells-us-why-t117583?cid=public-rss_20171016
PersonsSusanne Shultz
TitleBig and brilliant: complex whale behavior tied to brain size
Media name / outletMail Online
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date16/10/17
DescriptionWASHINGTON, Oct 16 (Reuters) - Cetaceans -- whales and dolphins -- are among the brainiest of beings. In terms of sheer brain size, the sperm whale is tops on Earth, with a brain six times larger than that of a person.
URLwww.dailymail.co.uk/wires/reuters/article-4986650/Big-brilliant-complex-whale-behavior-tied-brain-size.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
PersonsSusanne Shultz
TitleOur Dolphin Overlords Have Rich, Humanlike Cultures Thanks to Their Giant Brains
Media name / outletNewsweek
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited States
Date16/10/17
DescriptionCetaceans, the group of animals including dolphins and whales, are intelligent, big-brained creatures with several social behaviors similar to those of humans. And, according to new research, the bigger the brain, the more social the cetacean.
URLwww.newsweek.com/our-dolphin-overlords-have-rich-human-cultures-thanks-their-giant-brains-685845
PersonsSusanne Shultz
TitleDolphins have ‘human-like’ societies...but are held back by a lack of opposable thumbs, say scientists
Media name / outletThe Telegraph
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date16/10/17
DescriptionWhales and dolphins live in human-like societies and share similar brain evolution to primates and man, scientist have concluded.
URLwww.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/10/16/dolphins-have-human-like-societiesbut-held-back-lack-opposable/
PersonsSusanne Shultz

Keywords

  • dolphins, whales, cetaceans, evolution