SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN: Babysitting Mammals Keep It in the Family

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 20/6/2018

Description

Evolutionary biologist Susanne Shultz at the University of Manchester, who has studied links between social life and brain evolution, agrees that the challenges to animals living in groups consisting of highly or barely related individuals are quite different. “I think this distinction is an important one, and this analysis makes a massive contribution to the discussion,” Shultz says. “Not just about the nature of social complexity, but the evolution of cooperation as well.”

Media contributions

TitleBabysitting Mammals Keep It in the Family
Media name/outletScientific American
Media typeWeb
Country/TerritoryUnited States
Date20/06/18
DescriptionEvolutionary biologist Susanne Shultz at the University of Manchester, who has studied links between social life and brain evolution, agrees that the challenges to animals living in groups consisting of highly or barely related individuals are quite different. “I think this distinction is an important one, and this analysis makes a massive contribution to the discussion,” Shultz says. “Not just about the nature of social complexity, but the evolution of cooperation as well.”
URLhttps://www.scientificamerican.com/article/babysitting-mammals-keep-it-in-the-family/
PersonsSusanne Shultz