NEWSWEEK: The Anthropocene Era: Do We Now Live on a 'Human Planet'?

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 23/4/2019

Description

Ten years ago a group of geologists assembled to consider a startling proposition: That human impacts on the Earth are so profound they are unintentionally tipping it over a geological threshold.

The proposition was first made back in 2000 by Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Paul Crutzen. He coined a neologism, ‘the Anthropocene’, because he believed that people (the Anthropos) were transforming the hydro-, cryo-, pedo-, bio- and atmosphere so much that the Holocene was ending. The Holocene is the inter-glacial epoch in which humans have flourished, starting about 11,700 years ago.

Media coverage

TitleThe Anthropocene Era: Do We Now Live on a 'Human Planet'?
Media name/outletNewsweek
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited States
Date23/04/19
DescriptionTen years ago a group of geologists assembled to consider a startling proposition: That human impacts on the Earth are so profound they are unintentionally tipping it over a geological threshold.

The proposition was first made back in 2000 by Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Paul Crutzen. He coined a neologism, ‘the Anthropocene’, because he believed that people (the Anthropos) were transforming the hydro-, cryo-, pedo-, bio- and atmosphere so much that the Holocene was ending. The Holocene is the inter-glacial epoch in which humans have flourished, starting about 11,700 years ago.
URLhttps://www.newsweek.com/anthropocene-era-age-humans-1403403
PersonsNoel Castree