NEWSWEEK: COVID-19 Antibodies Appear to Last for at Least Two Months, Preliminary Study Shows

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 16/6/2020

Description

Daniel M. Davis, professor of immunology at the University of Manchester who did not work on the paper, told Newsweek: "Understanding how antibody production varies among people is vital for many reasons, not least in learning how to treat people appropriately."

Six months into the COVID-19 pandemic which has killed over 437,000 people in more than 8 million cases, it remains unclear whether people who catch the virus are protected against future reinfections.

Davis, the author of The Beautiful Cure, a book about the immune system, said: "Crucially, the mere presence of antibodies in a person's blood doesn't signify whether or not a person is really protected from being re-infected.

Addressing the differences in white and non-white participants, he said: "There could be any number of reasons for this, especially because only a small number of people were tested. Also, it's not clear whether such a small difference would have any biological consequence in itself."

Davis said: "Importantly, this study has not been peer-reviewed and must be taken as preliminary."

Media contributions

TitleCOVID-19 Antibodies Appear to Last for at Least Two Months, Preliminary Study Shows
Media name/outletNewsweek
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited States
Date16/06/20
DescriptionDaniel M. Davis, professor of immunology at the University of Manchester who did not work on the paper, told Newsweek: "Understanding how antibody production varies among people is vital for many reasons, not least in learning how to treat people appropriately."

Six months into the COVID-19 pandemic which has killed over 437,000 people in more than 8 million cases, it remains unclear whether people who catch the virus are protected against future reinfections.

Davis, the author of The Beautiful Cure, a book about the immune system, said: "Crucially, the mere presence of antibodies in a person's blood doesn't signify whether or not a person is really protected from being re-infected.

Addressing the differences in white and non-white participants, he said: "There could be any number of reasons for this, especially because only a small number of people were tested. Also, it's not clear whether such a small difference would have any biological consequence in itself."

Davis said: "Importantly, this study has not been peer-reviewed and must be taken as preliminary."
URLhttps://www.newsweek.com/covid-19-antibodies-two-months-preliminary-study-1511165
PersonsDaniel Davis