NEW YORK TIMES: A Brexit Compromise Nobody Likes: What Could Be More English?

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 22/11/2018

Description

And many in Westminster began speaking confidently of a new wrinkle. Mrs. May might not muster enough Parliamentary support to pass the bill in mid-December, according to Rob Ford, a professor of politics at the University of Manchester. But if her government survives long enough to put it to a second vote, he said, she has a good chance of getting it through.

“The groups that dislike it will realize that there is no way of getting their preferred outcome,” he said. “The deal could be as popular as leprosy with the public and that strategic calculus would not have changed one iota.”

Leprosy indeed. Remainers don’t like it because they did not want to leave the European Union in the first place. Hard-line Brexiteers don’t like it because it leaves Britain in too many European structures. Soft Brexiteers — who want, well, a softer break — don’t like it because it removes the country from too many structures. The only people who are satisfied are those primarily concerned with immigration, and polls, Mr. Ford said, suggest that group is rapidly shrinking.

Media contributions

TitleA Brexit Compromise Nobody Likes: What Could Be More English?
Media name/outletNew York Times
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited States
Date22/11/18
DescriptionAnd many in Westminster began speaking confidently of a new wrinkle. Mrs. May might not muster enough Parliamentary support to pass the bill in mid-December, according to Rob Ford, a professor of politics at the University of Manchester. But if her government survives long enough to put it to a second vote, he said, she has a good chance of getting it through.

“The groups that dislike it will realize that there is no way of getting their preferred outcome,” he said. “The deal could be as popular as leprosy with the public and that strategic calculus would not have changed one iota.”

Leprosy indeed. Remainers don’t like it because they did not want to leave the European Union in the first place. Hard-line Brexiteers don’t like it because it leaves Britain in too many European structures. Soft Brexiteers — who want, well, a softer break — don’t like it because it removes the country from too many structures. The only people who are satisfied are those primarily concerned with immigration, and polls, Mr. Ford said, suggest that group is rapidly shrinking.
URLhttps://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/22/world/europe/brexit-uk-theresa-may.html
PersonsRobert Ford