MANCHESTER EVENING NEWS: Why do inner city children in Manchester do so much worse at school than the same children in London?

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 26/3/2018

Description

Prof Mel Ainscow, of the University of Manchester , who led the Greater Manchester Challenge, says our version has not left the same legacy simply because it was cut short. London’s was eight years long, while the one here was only three.

“You need at least five to 10 years to bring about meaningful change,” says Prof Ainscow.

“The problem is, politicians don’t have that long.”

“The search for simple answers have long been the problem.

“What’s missing in education policy is an effective co-ordination arrangement.”

Prof Ainscow, who now chairs the education and employability board at the Greater Manchester Combined Authority , insists schools in Manchester are far from ‘crisis point’.

The professor does concede poverty, deprivation and lack of aspiration have hampered inner city schoolkids for years.

“Home background is still the best predictor of educational outcomes in the school system,” he adds.

Children of immigrant families arrive in London and school with a desire to make their move a success, he said.

“There is no doubt about it, London schools have been able to take advantage of immigrant families who have moved to this country with big aspirations”, adds Prof Ainscow.

Media contributions

TitleWhy do inner city children in Manchester do so much worse at school than the same children in London?
Media name/outletManchester Evening News
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date26/03/18
DescriptionProf Mel Ainscow, of the University of Manchester , who led the Greater Manchester Challenge, says our version has not left the same legacy simply because it was cut short. London’s was eight years long, while the one here was only three.

“You need at least five to 10 years to bring about meaningful change,” says Prof Ainscow.

“The problem is, politicians don’t have that long.”

“The search for simple answers have long been the problem.

“What’s missing in education policy is an effective co-ordination arrangement.”

Prof Ainscow, who now chairs the education and employability board at the Greater Manchester Combined Authority , insists schools in Manchester are far from ‘crisis point’.

The professor does concede poverty, deprivation and lack of aspiration have hampered inner city schoolkids for years.

“Home background is still the best predictor of educational outcomes in the school system,” he adds.

Children of immigrant families arrive in London and school with a desire to make their move a success, he said.

“There is no doubt about it, London schools have been able to take advantage of immigrant families who have moved to this country with big aspirations”, adds Prof Ainscow.
URLhttps://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/manchester-schools-education-london-disadvantaged-14460590
PersonsMelvin Ainscow