MAIL ONLINE: Dinosaur remains at Jurassic site `could help plan for climate change´

Press/Media: Research

Release date: 16/8/2019

Description

Work uncovering dozens of dinosaur remains at a Jurassic site could help the world plan for climate change, a scientist on the project has said.

Bones, fossils and tracks from the prehistoric creatures have been excavated from the Mission Jurassic site in Wyoming, USA.

Professor Phil Manning, chairman of natural history at the University of Manchester and one of the lead scientists on the project, said the site offered a window on the world 150 million years ago.

He said: “The Jurassic period was a time of global climate change. As the supercontinent of Pangea broke up, this had massive impacts on atmospheric circulation patterns around the globe, impacting the evolution of all life on Earth.

Media coverage

TitleDinosaur remains at Jurassic site `could help plan for climate change´
Media name/outletMail Online (Press Association)
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date16/08/19
DescriptionWork uncovering dozens of dinosaur remains at a Jurassic site could help the world plan for climate change, a scientist on the project has said.

Bones, fossils and tracks from the prehistoric creatures have been excavated from the Mission Jurassic site in Wyoming, USA.

Professor Phil Manning, chairman of natural history at the University of Manchester and one of the lead scientists on the project, said the site offered a window on the world 150 million years ago.

He said: “The Jurassic period was a time of global climate change. As the supercontinent of Pangea broke up, this had massive impacts on atmospheric circulation patterns around the globe, impacting the evolution of all life on Earth.
URLhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-7363563/Dinosaur-remains-Jurassic-site-help-plan-climate-change.html
PersonsPhillip Manning

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