iNEWS: Has Twitter become the new regulator of the press?

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 22/9/2019

Description

The Apology Impulse’ by Sir Cary Cooper and Sean O’Mara, reports on the “outrage culture” of social media and says public apologies are being made at the rate of 35 per month by high profile organisations and individuals. Often these are “fauxpologies” designed to quell a social storm.Twitter is a useful tool for those who feel they have been traduced by the media but the same platform is abused to troll individual journalists, such as the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg, and to promote false narratives. It’s also less effective if you don’t have 670,000 followers like Ben Stokes.Social media storms and forced apologies are not the answer. All we need is a basic sense of decency in newsrooms.

Media contributions

TitleHas Twitter become the new regulator of the press?
Media name/outletiNews
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date22/09/19
DescriptionThe Apology Impulse’ by Sir Cary Cooper and Sean O’Mara, reports on the “outrage culture” of social media and says public apologies are being made at the rate of 35 per month by high profile organisations and individuals. Often these are “fauxpologies” designed to quell a social storm.Twitter is a useful tool for those who feel they have been traduced by the media but the same platform is abused to troll individual journalists, such as the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg, and to promote false narratives. It’s also less effective if you don’t have 670,000 followers like Ben Stokes.Social media storms and forced apologies are not the answer. All we need is a basic sense of decency in newsrooms.
URLhttps://inews.co.uk/opinion/has-twitter-become-the-new-regulator-of-the-press-636191
PersonsCary Cooper