CONVERSATION: Violent crime: decades of research shows punishing ‘risky’ young people does not work – here’s what does

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 7/3/2019

Description

Violent crime among young people has reached a worrying high in parts of the UK over recent years. There’s been a year-on-year increase in knife offences committed by young people since March 2014. In 2017/18 alone, there were more than 100 knife-related homicides with victims under 24 years old. London, in particular, has experienced a surge in knife-related incidents in 2019.

Politicians, journalists and activists all agree that this rise in violence (particularly knife crime) must be tackled as an absolute priority. While there have been plenty of emotive arguments from all corners on ways to prevent violent crime, no one can agree on exactly how this should be done.

Media coverage

TitleViolent crime: decades of research shows punishing ‘risky’ young people does not work – here’s what does
Media name/outletThe Conversation
Media typeWeb
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date7/03/19
DescriptionViolent crime among young people has reached a worrying high in parts of the UK over recent years. There’s been a year-on-year increase in knife offences committed by young people since March 2014. In 2017/18 alone, there were more than 100 knife-related homicides with victims under 24 years old. London, in particular, has experienced a surge in knife-related incidents in 2019.

Politicians, journalists and activists all agree that this rise in violence (particularly knife crime) must be tackled as an absolute priority. While there have been plenty of emotive arguments from all corners on ways to prevent violent crime, no one can agree on exactly how this should be done.
URLhttps://theconversation.com/violent-crime-decades-of-research-shows-punishing-risky-young-people-does-not-work-heres-what-does-111143
PersonsJo Deakin, Laura Bui