BBC WORLD SERVICE: Health Check

Press/Media: Research

Release date: 14/2/2019

Description

Repeated exposure to the sun ages everyone, but new research now shows that there are remarkable differences between white and black skin in terms of damage sustained by the effects of the sun. Dr Abigail Langton, a research fellow at the University of Manchester compared black and white 18 to 30 year olds with seventy years olds and found ageing happens about fifty years more slowly in black people than white. The study was written up in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswjlt

Media coverage

TitleHealth Check
Media name/outletBBC World Service
Media typeRadio
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date14/02/19
DescriptionRepeated exposure to the sun ages everyone, but new research now shows that there are remarkable differences between white and black skin in terms of damage sustained by the effects of the sun. Dr Abigail Langton, a research fellow at the University of Manchester compared black and white 18 to 30 year olds with seventy years olds and found ageing happens about fifty years more slowly in black people than white. The study was written up in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswjlt
URLhttps://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswjlt
PersonsAbigail Langton