BBC RADIO 4: The Battles That Won Our Freedoms

Press/Media: Expert comment

Release date: 17/1/2019

Description

In this episode, Phil Tinline asks Professor Frank Mort about the journalist Peter Wildeblood's prosecution for homosexual offences in 1954, Wildeblood's risky decision to be open about his homosexuality - and how this intersected with the work of the committee appointed by Churchill's last government to explore the possibility of changing the law. Stonewall founder Lisa Power recalls how it was only after male homosexual acts were partly decriminalised in 1967 that the movement for gay liberation took off. And how, after the failure to stop Section 28, the late 1980s saw the birth of a new approach - which began a mainstream political struggle to win the freedoms of today.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00021qw

Media coverage

TitleThe Battles That Won Our Freedoms
Media name/outletBBC Radio 4
Media typeRadio
CountryUnited Kingdom
Date17/01/19
DescriptionIn this episode, Phil Tinline asks Professor Frank Mort about the journalist Peter Wildeblood's prosecution for homosexual offences in 1954, Wildeblood's risky decision to be open about his homosexuality - and how this intersected with the work of the committee appointed by Churchill's last government to explore the possibility of changing the law. Stonewall founder Lisa Power recalls how it was only after male homosexual acts were partly decriminalised in 1967 that the movement for gay liberation took off. And how, after the failure to stop Section 28, the late 1980s saw the birth of a new approach - which began a mainstream political struggle to win the freedoms of today.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00021qw
URLhttps://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00021qw
PersonsFrank Mort