Promoting small farmer cooperation for sustainable livelihoods in India and Nepal

Impact: Societal impacts, Cultural impacts, Political impacts

Narrative

Bina Agarwal’s research led an international organisation and several NGOs to introduce an unusual institutional innovation – group farming – in India and Nepal. As a result:
• In Bihar, West Bengal (eastern India) and eastern Nepal, 140 poor farmers formed 20 collectives, which: (1) increased their bargaining power vis-à-vis landlords; (2) improved the efficiency of land and machine use; (3) enabled access to government subsidies; (4) reduced input costs; and (5) enhanced yields and livelihoods.
• In Gujarat (western India), 92 tribal women formed 16 collectives, opening a pathway to greater food security.

Moreover, Agarwal’s research in Kerala (south India), led an extant programme of 68,000 women’s group farms (with 300,000 members) to incorporate more caste-disadvantaged women.

In all regions, the group farming model is continuing and has proved effective in protecting livelihoods and food security during the coronavirus pandemic.

Category of impact

  • Societal impacts
  • Cultural impacts
  • Political impacts
Date
2015 - 2020

Related information

Publications

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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